What To Look For In An Air Purifier If Your Child Has Asthma

Any adult who suffers from asthma will tell you that it’s no joke. It is a serious condition that many of us suffer from. And if you have a child with asthma, it’s not only bad for your child, but it breaks your heart to see your little one suffer. One thing that you can do to make your home safer for both you and your children is to get an air purifier.

An air purifier will clean the air in your home and remove dangerous pollutants and allergens from the air. A good air purifier will help to alleviate asthma symptoms and help you to breathe easier. But what should you look for in these machines? Which are best for those who suffer with asthma? No worries. We have some tips to help you buy the right one for you and your situation so you can clean the air in your home.

HEPA air filters

HEPA stands for High-Efficiency Particulate Air filters. They trap microscopic contaminants, eliminating 99.97% of all particles larger than 0.3 microns. HyperHEPA filters remove particles as small as 0.003 microns!

The HEPA filter’s fibers are made for trapping particles in the air. Particles larger than one micron stick to the fibers as the air flows through. Smaller, lighter particles keep “going with the flow” longer before bumping into a fiber. The HEPA filter’s accordion-style pleats create obstacles, ensuring that even the tiniest particles get trapped. They get the bad stuff out of the air and this is why they are an industry standard.

Make sure that your air purifier is specifically for asthma sufferers

While any air purifier will help, you want to make sure that yours is specifically designed for asthma. Any good machine will capture airborne pollen, dust, and other allergens, but we want some extra clean air here. Asthma-specific machines usually have HEPA and/or activated charcoal filtration. While air purifiers can’t actually cure allergies or asthma they will filter airborne allergens and offer substantial relief by reducing our triggers.

If you have an activated charcoal filter, it works by removing microscopic particles by using chemical adsorption. When treating it with oxygen, the carbon becomes activated, opening up millions of tiny pores between the carbon atoms. This creates a large surface area in a small space, which is ideal for absorbing microscopic contaminants like dust and pollen.

Consider the size of the air purifier

To choose the right size machine for your needs, look at the square footage of the room you want to clean up. Then find an air purifier with a recommended square foot coverage area that matches your room’s size.

Air Change Per Hour

Allergy and asthma sufferers want an air purifier with a good “air change per hour” (ACH) rate. This refers to the number of times an air purifier can filter the entire volume of air in the room each hour. Air purifiers that can clean the air in a space at least 4 times per hour are best for allergy- and asthma.  This ensures that the air purifier thoroughly cleans the air and filters out as many microscopic symptom-triggering allergens as possible.

How often do you want to change the filter?

It’s great to have cleaner and more breathable air, but we do have to put in some work. You’ll need to change the filter in these units every so often. Some models need to be changed every month, while others only twice a year. It varies, so make sure that you pay attention to how often you will need to do this in order to buy one that fits your lifestyle.

Well, those are the basics. Follow these simple tips and you’ll have no trouble finding an air purifier that will clean up your home’s air. Breathe easy friends.

Air purifiers vs humidifiers for breathing problems

Not sure if an air purifier is the right solution? Check out this article that explains how humidifiers can help with upper respiratory discomfort caused by croup.

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